TenNine launches Talking To Youth

Press Release : March 08, 2010
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TenNine are delighted to announce the launch of TalkingToYouth, our new blog. TenNine is the leading media owner in secondary schools and youth centres, and the purpose of this blog is to facilitate a candid dialogue between all parties concerned with responsible communications aimed at young people.
With politicians and pundits taking an increasing interest in youth media, there is a real need for advertisers and educators to communicate with each other.
TenNine has recently been involved with some hard hitting marketing campaigns involving graphic images and strong wording. Our member institutions have widely differing views on what should be show on their premises and these challenging messages have provoked a lot of comment from schools and clubs, as well as from advertisers.
As the leading supplier of responsible advertising in secondary schools and youth centres, our members have confidence in ability to recognise what is suitable, so we are perfectly placed to shed some light on these difficult questions. TalkingToYouth looks at the big issues in youth media and provides a forum for educators, youth workers and advertisers to post candid comments.
Our first blogs are about the graphic image of a girl with her mouth sewn shut used by Beat Bullying, the controversial attempt by Kelloggs to promote Coco Pops as an after-school snack and the strong language in the Home Office campaign to reduce violence against women and girls.
Alan Scurfield, MD of TenNine, said that:
The relationships we have with our 1,000+ member schools and youth centres make us ideally placed to host the conversation between advertisers and education/youth providers. The site will attract input from PSHE Coordinators, Head Teachers and youth workers, and showcase their views for marketing professionals to take note.
As we build our audience, the blog will develop into a useful resource for everyone with an interest in responsible communications with young people, including industry professionals, government and commercial advertisers, educators and youth workers.
Please take the time to visit and if you have any suggestions (or criticisms!) we would be very happy to hear them.

Notes to editors

For more information please contact:
Tel: email: Visit the newsroom of: Mark